NO MAN’S LAND

  • Nina Chanel Abney, Khaaliqua & Jeff (detail), 2007; Acrylic on canvas, 61 x 63 3/4 in.; Courtesy of the Rubell Family Collection
    Nina Chanel Abney, Khaaliqua & Jeff (detail), 2007; Acrylic on canvas, 61 x 63 3/4 in.; Courtesy of the Rubell Family Collection
  • Cecily Brown, Service de Luxe (detail), 1999; Oil on linen, 75 x 75 x 2 in.; Courtesy of the Rubell Family Collection
    Cecily Brown, Service de Luxe (detail), 1999; Oil on linen, 75 x 75 x 2 in.; Courtesy of the Rubell Family Collection
  • Solange Pessoa, Hammock, 1999–2003; Fabric, earth, and sponges, 85 x 166 x 48 in. (dimensions variable); Courtesy of the Rubell Family Collection
    Solange Pessoa, Hammock, 1999–2003; Fabric, earth, and sponges, 85 x 166 x 48 in. (dimensions variable); Courtesy of the Rubell Family Collection

NO MAN’S LAND: Women Artists from the Rubell Family Collection on view September 30, 2016–January 08, 2017.

NMWA is collaborating with the Rubell Family Collection (RFC) to realize a new vision for NO MAN’S LAND, an exhibition that opened at the RFC’s space in Miami in December 2015. Featuring work by 37 artists from 15 countries, NMWA’s presentation imagines a visual conversation between women artists new to the Rubell Family Collection and those whose works they began collecting decades ago.

NMWA curators worked with RFC to choose a highly focused group of paintings and sculptures that center on the process of making as well as images of the female body, both topics that extend from the feminist art movement of the 1970s. Many artists in the exhibition use labor-intensive techniques to alter conventional notions of “women’s work” and handcraft. Some sculpt or paint semi-abstract shapes that reference the body obliquely, while others depict the female form directly, forcefully reclaiming its visualization and interpretation.

Painting and sculpture are among the oldest and traditionally most revered mediums of fine art, yet in the hands of many contemporary artists, they are avenues for experimentation, play, and subversion. Artists in NO MAN’S LAND paint with neon, weave with Carnival beads, and glue metal bread baskets into their assemblages.

Established in 1964 in New York City by Don and Mera Rubell, the Rubell Family Collection is one of the world’s largest privately owned contemporary art collections. Located in Miami, Florida, since 1993, the RFC is exhibited within a 45,000-square-foot re-purposed Drug Enforcement Agency confiscated goods facility and is publicly accessible.

Please note that an artwork on view in NO MAN’S LAND contains walnuts.

RELATED MEDIA:


Image from the online exhibition

NO MAN’S LAND Online Exhibition

This online exhibition provides an immersive look at the exhibition with commentary from the curators, collectors, and artists.


Broad Strokes blog logo

NO MAN’S LAND Blog Posts

Explore exhibition themes and artworks in depth in this special blog series. Continue to check back as new posts are added.


Li Shurui, I am not ready..., 2013

NO MAN’S LAND Audio Guide

Hear discussions of the artworks by the collectors and artists themselves. Transcripts available for download.


Anicka Yi, Life Serves Up The Occasional Pink Unicorn, 2013

NO MAN’S LAND Videos

Explore this online playlist of videos related to the exhibition, the artists, and the collectors.


This exhibition is organized by the Rubell Family Collection, Miami. Presentation of the exhibition at NMWA is made possible through the generous support of the Clara M. Lovett Emerging Artists Fund. Additional funding is provided by the Judith A. Finkelstein Exhibition Fund, Stephanie Sale, and Share Fund.

 

National Museum of Women in the Arts