Press Room

NO MAN’S LAND: Women Artists from the Rubell Family Collection Special Exhibition

Aug 22 2016

Featuring 37 contemporary women artists exploring images of the female body and the physical process of making

WASHINGTON—The National Museum of Women in the Arts (NMWA) is pleased to present the exhibition NO MAN’S LAND: Women Artists from the Rubell Family Collection on view from Sept. 30, 2016, through Jan. 8, 2017. Born in 16 countries across five continents, 37 contemporary artists use their aesthetically diverse work to address varied political and intellectual themes. The presentation is organized by the Rubell Family Collection (RFC)/Contemporary Arts Foundation, Miami, in collaboration with NMWA. The exhibition in Washington, D.C., centers on the process of making as well as images of the female body—both topics that extend from the feminist art movement of the 1970s.

Among the celebrated artists whose work is featured in the exhibition are Cecily Brown, Marlene Dumas, Isa Genzken, Yayoi Kusama, Wangechi Mutu, Elizabeth Peyton, Dana Schutz, Mickalene Thomas and Rosemarie Trockel.

This highly focused selection of 59 works concentrates on painting and sculpture. These mediums are among the oldest and traditionally most revered fine art forms, yet in the hands of many contemporary artists, they are avenues for experimentation, play, and subversion.

NO MAN’S LAND brings together artists new to the Rubell Family Collection and those whose works they began collecting decades ago. Speaking about the D.C. iteration of the exhibition, Mera Rubell states, “It is especially meaningful for us to have NO MAN’S LAND open in our nation’s capital around the time when women’s leadership in all arenas is front and center in the public consciousness.”

“We are thrilled to be the first traveling venue for NO MAN’S LAND, which premiered in Miami last December,” said NMWA Director Susan Fisher Sterling. “We have truly enjoyed collaborating with the Rubell Family Collection—one of the largest and most diverse privately held contemporary collections in the world. From the original exhibition, which extended over 45,000 square feet, our curators worked with the RFC to create a tightly focused exhibition centered on the body and the process of making. These themes define some of the most compelling works made by contemporary women artists.”

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National Museum of Women in the Arts