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Lola Álvarez Bravo

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5 Fast Facts: Lola Álvarez Bravo

Posted: June 2, 2020
Category: Lola Álvarez Bravo
Impress your friends with five fast facts about Lola Álvarez Bravo, one of Mexico’s first women photographers.
Black-and-white photograph of a woman wearing a dark skirt and light blouse holding a child. The woman faces back and her dark braid reaches past her waist. The dark-haired child stares at the camera and wears a white embroidered dress. Other figures are slightly visible beyond.
NMWA’s collection features many depictions of women and their families that offer varied perspectives and inspirations. Learn about work by artists Mary Cassatt, Elizabeth Catlett, Lola Álvarez Bravo, and Louise...
Black and white print of two dark-skinned individuals in profile. The person in the background is an older adult wearing a brimmed hat, and in the foreground and slightly to the right is a young child in profile.

Graciela Iturbide and La Matanza: Ritual as Practice and Subject

Posted: April 20, 2020
Category: Lola Álvarez Bravo
Photography and its ritualistic qualities—observation, development, and selection—is a form of therapy for Graciela Iturbide. More than simply documenting moments in time, the practice offers her a way to process...
A black-and-white photograph shows the back of a woman as she crests a rocky path above a vast desert landscape beneath an expansive sky. Her traditional, ethnic full skirt, long-sleeved blouse, and long, straight, dark hair contrasts with the modern portable stereo she carries.

Beyond Documentation: Graciela Iturbide and the Seri

Posted: April 6, 2020
Category: Lola Álvarez Bravo
In 1979, with anthropologist Luis Barjau, Graciela Iturbide stayed with the Seri community for more than two months, recording their lives with her camera—particularly their forced adaptation to modern life,...
A black-and-white photograph shows the back of a woman as she crests a rocky path above a vast desert landscape beneath an expansive sky. Her traditional, ethnic full skirt, long-sleeved blouse, and long, straight, dark hair contrasts with the modern portable stereo she carries.

NMWA @ Home: Creative Coping with Lynora Williams and Adrienne Poon

Posted: April 2, 2020
Category: Lola Álvarez Bravo
As NMWA remains temporarily closed due to COVID-19, we check in with staff for a personal look at the creative ways they’re staying connected, inspired, and grounded.
Abstract painting with large, gestural swaths of pink, yellow, peach, and gray. Scatered black lines and white brushstrokes at right.

5 Fast Facts about #5WomenArtists Changing the World: Mickalene Thomas

Posted: March 30, 2020
Category: Lola Álvarez Bravo
Artist Mickalene Thomas's vibrant works have established a contemporary vision of female sexuality, beauty, race, and power, while centering queer identity.
An enamel portrait painting of a woman made with encrusted black rhinestones glued to shiny pink acrylic background.

Portraying Gender in Graciela Iturbide’s Mexico

Posted: March 23, 2020
Category: Lola Álvarez Bravo
In 1979, Graciela Iturbide traveled to Juchitán, a small town in the Mexican state of Oaxaca, to photograph the Zapotec indigenous group. She immersed herself in the community during a...
A black-and-white photograph shows the back of a woman as she crests a rocky path above a vast desert landscape beneath an expansive sky. Her traditional, ethnic full skirt, long-sleeved blouse, and long, straight, dark hair contrasts with the modern portable stereo she carries.

5 Fast Facts about #5WomenArtists Changing the World: Susan Goethel Campbell

Posted: March 11, 2020
Category: Lola Álvarez Bravo
Multidisciplinary artist Susan Goethel Campbell creates installations, videos, prints, drawings, and artists’ books to highlight the indistinguishable characteristics of nature, culture, and the built environment.
A closed view of Susan Goethel Campbell's artists' book "RIM," which resembles a mental block.

Cultural Symbols in Graciela Iturbide’s Mexico

Posted: March 9, 2020
Category: Lola Álvarez Bravo
The photographs of Graciela Iturbide feature social, religious, and natural symbols that define Mexican cultural and national identities in all of their complexity.
A black-and-white photograph shows the back of a woman as she crests a rocky path above a vast desert landscape beneath an expansive sky. Her traditional, ethnic full skirt, long-sleeved blouse, and long, straight, dark hair contrasts with the modern portable stereo she carries.

5 Fast Facts about #5WomenArtists Changing the World: Guerrilla Girls

Posted: March 4, 2020
Category: Lola Álvarez Bravo
Since 1985, the Guerrilla Girls, a collective of anonymous feminist activist artists, have brought widespread attention to the issues of sexism and racism in the art world.