Art Fix Friday: December 8, 2017

Lubaina Himid becomes the first woman of color to win the Turner Prize since it was established in 1984, reports Hyperallergic. At the age of 63, Himid is also the oldest artist to win the U.K.’s prestigious award. Until this year, only artists under the age of 50 were eligible.

Himid told BBC, “I think it will get people talking, which is the point of my work.” Himid’s artwork addresses racial politics and the legacy of slavery. The prize judges praised her “uncompromising tackling of issues including colonial history and how racism persists today.” The Art Newspaper, the Guardian, and the Telegraph explore Himid’s work and Turner Prize history.

Front-Page Femmes

artnet explores NMWA artist Amy Sherald’s art-market success.

NPR discusses Time’s Person of the Year for 2017, the #MeToo social media movement, and the silence breakers who have helped raise awareness about sexual harassment and assault.

Think Progress shares El Tendedero/The Clothesline Project, the bilingual installation on violence against women at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

NMWA Associate Curator Ginny Treanor and Magnetic Fields artist Lilian Thomas Burwell discuss the exhibition on the Kojo Nnamdi Show on WAMU 88.5.

Through an analysis of the 199 galleries showing at this year’s Art Basel, Artsy find that dealers who are women are 28% more likely to show artists who are women.

Liza Dracup reflects on her best work, a photograph of a barn owl.

Nicola L.’s works are “forceful and appealing, with their bright colors, stylized representations of the human body, and humorous applications of faux fur, perspex, and vinyl.”

German photographer Alma Haser prints photographs of twins onto a 500 or 1,000-piece puzzles and switches every other piece to create two works that are an equal combination of each sibling.

Caitlin McCormack’s fiber sculptures investigate the warping of memory over time through the breakdown of physical material.

Netflix will film eight more episodes of House of Cards for a final season that will feature the show’s female lead, Robin Wright.

The New Yorker delves into Anna Kavan’s novel, Ice, a “fantasia about predatory male sexual behavior that takes place during an apocalyptic climate catastrophe.”

Shows We Want to See

Aliza Nisenbaum: A Place We Share at the Minneapolis Institute of Art upends class and status structures through majestic group portraits.

Hyperallergic interviews Cecilia Fajardo-Hill, a curator of the Radical Women exhibition at the Hammer Museum, about how the show fills historical gaps with the contributions of Latin American women.

Trigger: Gender as a Tool and a Weapon at the New Museum “seeks a space beyond that taxonomic obsession.”

Photographer and filmmaker Laura Aguilar’s self-portraits shot in the Mojave Desert, ephemera from her college years and early career, family snapshots, and a few short films are on view at the Vincent Price Art Museum.

—Emily Haight is the digital editorial associate at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Artist Spotlight: Mildred Thompson

Magnetic Fields: Expanding American Abstraction, 1960s to Today places abstract works by multiple generations of black women artists in context with one another—and within the larger history of abstract art—for the first time, revealing the artists’ role as under-recognized leaders in abstraction.

Magnetic Fields (1991)

By: Mildred Thompson (b. 1936, Jacksonville, Florida; d. 2003, Atlanta)

“Each new creation presents a visual manifestation of the sum total of this lifelong investigation and serves as a reaffirmation of my commitment to the arts,” said Mildred Thompson. NMWA’s exhibition features four works by Thompson, including three wall sculptures made from found wood and painted white, and the expansive painting Magnetic Fields (1991), from which the exhibition takes its name.

Mildred Thompson, Magnetic Fields, 1991; Oil on canvas, triptych, 70 1/2 x 150 in.; Courtesy of the Mildred Thompson Estate, Atlanta, Georgia; Art and photo © The Mildred Thompson Estate, Atlanta, Georgia

Magnetic Fields exemplifies Thompson’s style. She often found inspiration in scientific theories and universal systems. The triptych contains a vibrant, buzzing palette of yellows and reds—as well as a combination of calligraphic brushstrokes and geographic shapes—to evoke Thompson’s visual interpretation of the invisible forces of magnetic energy. After receiving her BA in 1957 from Howard University in Washington, D.C., Thompson spent three years at the Hamburg Art Academy in Germany. She later moved to New York City, where the Museum of Modern Art and the Brooklyn Museum acquired her work—a significant recognition of her talents. However, feeling the effects of racial and gender discrimination in the U.S., Thompson moved to Europe for 13 years. She returned to the U.S. in 1986, and proceeded to create art as well as teach art history, art theory, and studio art, in Atlanta for the last 18 years of her life.

Installation view of Magnetic Fields; Photo: Katie Benz, NMWA

Over four decades, Thompson produced more than 5,000 works in painting, drawing, printmaking, photography, and sculpture. Thompson was one of only a few black women artists trained in the European tradition of Abstract Expressionism, to which she devoted her life. Renowned for her lively abstract paintings and unique use of color, Thompson continuously worked to expand her abstract language and encouraged her students to search for new modes of artistic expression.

Visit the museum and explore Magnetic Fields, on view through January 21, 2018. Learn more through the Magnetic Fields Mobile Guide.

—Katie Benz is the fall 2017 digital engagement intern at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

A Cut Above: Kiki Kogelnik

Austrian-born artist Kiki Kogelnik (1935–1997) began her career as a gestural painter. It was not until 1961, when she moved from Paris, to Santa Monica, and later to New York—thereby eschewing the European abstraction and Viennese avant-garde art scenes of the time—that she developed the more Pop-inspired style for which she became best known.

In New York, she met American Pop Art giants Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, and Tom Wesselmann, all of whom helped spark Kogelnik’s fascination with new and developing technologies. Although known for her large-scale paintings, Kogelnik also dabbled in cut-out vinyl, fiberglass, glass, and print throughout her lifetime.

While Kogelnik’s work drew heavily from Pop influences, she rejected the movement’s roots in commercialism and objectification. Instead, Kogelnik chose to channel her developing feminist consciousness, offering commentary on the male-dominated art world and the use of women’s bodies in advertisement.

Superwoman (1973), part of NMWA’s collection, encapsulates Kogelnik’s trademark wit and criticism. Frustrated with the image of the hypersexualized damsel in distress presented in comic book media, she developed her own take on what a woman superhero would look like, freed from the male gaze. The harsh outline, static background, and intimidating pose embody traditional qualities of comic book art. However, the subject’s fatigues, boots, and demeanor are decidedly more androgynous than women in comics were typically afforded to be.

The piece may also be a self-portrait. Similar to the subject of the work, Kogelnik reputedly wore aviator hats and oversized sunglasses. The scissors are also a recurring symbol in Kogelnik’s work. They represent the artist’s ability to manipulate figures by “cutting” them from the fabric of the narrative. She also often created cut paper and vinyl stencils—modeled from herself or her friends—as a tool in her artistic practice. Fitting with Kogelnik’s tongue-in-cheek sense of humor, scissors could also be viewed as a reference to lesbianism—a popular topic in second wave and radical feminism.

Kogelnik’s work also frequently features machinery, which took her style another step away from conventional Pop Art. Kogelnik once said, “I’m not involved with Coca-Cola. I am involved with the technical beauty of rockets, people flying in space, and people becoming robots.” Her work often juxtaposed humanity and machinery, underscoring the fragility and unsustainability of the human form—particularly in comparison to the ceaseless evolution of technology.

—Ilayda Orankoy is the 2017 fall publications and communications/marketing intern at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Art Fix Friday: December 1, 2017

artnet writes, “The myth of the starving artist is anything but a myth.”

artnet reports that a recent Artfinder survey found that “In the US, a full three quarters of artists made $10,000 or less per year from their art. Close to half (48.7 percent) made no more than $5,000.” The study also found that it is worse for women—83.6% of the female artists surveyed earned less than $10,000 from their art, compared with 77% of male artists.

Front-Page Femmes

Mónica Mayer’s El Tendedero/The Clothesline Project at NMWA inspires women to share their experiences with domestic and sexual violence.

In her new Netflix film Mudbound, Mary J. Blige’s character, Florence Jackson, delves into themes of “racism, war, friendship, and struggles for success” in the deep South.

artnet explores the history of the Cyberfeminism movement.

Sheila Klein’s 1993 public art installation Vermonica was quietly removed from Santa Monica Boulevard without her knowledge. The work consisted of 25 examples of street poles and fixtures that have been part of the city’s history.

Hyperallergic calls Ellen Harvey’s exhibition “bedazzling and entrancing.”

The Art Newspaper asks “How long do you really need in Yayoi Kusama’s Infinity Mirrored Rooms?”

May Wilson, an artist whose “rebellious appropriation of the objects and images of women as homemakers, wives, mothers, and sex objects” helped fan the flames of women’s lib.

Romanian conceptualist Greta Brătescu views art as “serious play” that highlights disorder, happiness, and freedom.

The Divine Order examines that fight for women’s suffrage in Switzerland.

Playwright Sarah DeLappe’s production The Wolves charts an elite girls soccer team as it goes through a season.

Shows We Want to See

Murder Is Her Hobby, on view at the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Renwick Gallery, showcases 19 dioramas by Frances Glessner Lee. Both a master craftswoman and a pioneer in the field of forensic crime scene investigation, Lee crafted tiny replica crime scenes.

The Guardian writes, “The freedom and courage of Rose Wylie shows a way forward for painting in this century.” Rose Wylie: Quack Quack is on view at Serpentine Sackler Gallery in London.

DESHECHAS: Pía Camil | Ofelia Rofríguez, on view at Instituto de Visión in Bogotá, Colombia, explores two generations of work from Latin American women artists.

Annie Albers: Touching Vision at the Guggenheim Bilboa showcases the textile artist’s “eye for balance and harmony.”

—Emily Haight is the digital editorial associate at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Artist Spotlight: Shinique Smith

Magnetic Fields: Expanding American Abstraction, 1960s to Today places abstract works by multiple generations of black women artists in context with one another—and within the larger history of abstract art—for the first time, revealing the artists’ role as under-recognized leaders in abstraction.

Bale Variant No. 0017 (2009)

By: Shinique Smith (b. 1971, Baltimore, Maryland)

Shinique Smith, Bale Variant No. 0017, 2009; Fabric, ink, twine, ribbon, and wood, 72 x 52 x 52 in.; Denver Art Museum Collection; Gift of Baryn Futa to the Collection of the Denver Art Museum, 2013.6A-B; © Shinique Smith; Photo © Denver Art Museum

Shinique Smith’s Bale Variant No. 0017 is comprised entirely of found material; the massive installation involves more than 110 cubic feet of bundled fabric—mostly clothing—arranged in a white-to-blue gradient. Consequently, the density, scale, and weight of the piece all speak to Smith’s fascination with the ever-increasing velocity of American consumption. Bale Variant No. 0017, with its murky color scheme and battered textiles, conjures images of ocean debris and landfill compaction. Despite the almost overwhelming amount of content in the work, however, Smith’s roots in minimalism are evident in her dedication to clean, even shapes.

Bale Variant No. 0017 equalizes the personal narrative in each piece of found material. In treating both well-loved and long-forgotten articles of clothing with the same detachment, Smith assigns these fabrics a new sense of connection that questions the foundation of their original value. Additionally, there are personal notations from Smith and her friends hidden inside the folds of the clothing, further emphasizing the many contradicting perspectives contained within the bale—and, by association, within the act of consuming and discarding.

Like Bale Variant No. 0017, another work by Smith in Magnetic Fields, Whirlwind Dancer (2013–17), is both massive and densely layered. However, Whirlwind Dancer contains a distinct sense of motion that Bale Variant No. 0017 lacks. As the title suggests, Whirlwind Dancer’s climbing lines, twisting colors, and nebulous form create a cyclone of ink, acrylic, paper, fabric, and wood.

Smith’s attraction to collage, as a medium, lies in what she calls a “hybrid” nature. “The more hybrid something is, the stronger it is—think about DNA, in that sense—that really stuck with me. I feel like the more things can be brought into the mix and combined together, the stronger it can be visually, and the more interesting it is as a problem for me to solve.”

Visit the museum and explore Magnetic Fields, on view through January 21, 2018. Learn more through the Magnetic Fields Mobile Guide.

—Ilayda Orankoy is the 2017 fall publications and communications/marketing intern at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Florine Stettheimer: Painting Poetry

The next time you visit NMWA, come to the Betty Boyd Dettre Library and Research Center (LRC) to see new books on women in the arts, as well as reference books, artists’ books, and more.

Florine Stettheimer: Painting Poetry
Yale University Press, 2017

Cover of the exhibition catalogue Florine Stettheimer: Painting Poetry

Florine Stettheimer: Painting Poetry was published in conjunction with a retrospective exhibition on view at the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto (October 21, 2017–January 28, 2018), following its summer appearance at the Jewish Museum in New York. The exhibition presents paintings, drawings, and poems by Stettheimer (1871–1944), an independently wealthy and famously free-spirited New Yorker, as well as photographs and ephemera documenting her life. The book prominently features her poetry alongside her “idiosyncratic and irreverent” paintings—often naïve renderings of urbane subjects in acidic yellows, florid reds, and muted grays—which were rarely shown publicly during her lifetime.

In addition to her work as an artist, designer, and poet, Stettheimer hosted a salon that attracted artist friends including Marcel Duchamp, Georgia O’Keeffe, Alfred Stieglitz, and Carl Van Vechten. Essays by Jewish Museum curator Stephen Brown and Art Gallery of Ontario curator Georgiana Uhlyarik shed light on Stettheimer’s circle and bohemian life. An unusual feature of the book is a roundtable interview featuring seven contemporary artists—Cecily Brown, Jamian Juliano-Villani, Jutta Koether, Ella Kruglyanskaya, Valentina Liernur, Silke Otto-Knapp, and Katharina Wulff—who discuss Stettheimer’s influence and talent, relaying stories of their first or most significant encounters with her art. As Cecily Brown describes, Stettheimer’s work affects audiences through depictions of “interior spaces that read like psychological portraits.”

All are welcome to view this book, which will be available soon in the Betty Boyd Dettre Library and Research Center at the National Museum of Women in the Arts. If you’re touring the museum’s exhibitions, the library is open to the public and makes a great starting point on the fourth floor. In addition to beautiful books and comfortable chairs, library visitors enjoy interesting exhibitions that feature archival manuscripts, personal papers by women artists, rare books, and artists’ books. Reference Desk staff members are always happy to answer questions and offer assistance. Open Monday–Friday, 10 a.m.–12 p.m. and 1–5 p.m.

Elizabeth Lynch is the editor at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Art Fix Friday: November 17, 2017

Reports of women speaking out publicly about harassment and assault are gaining traction in the news.

The Washington Post and the Guardian discuss NMWA’s latest exhibition El Tendedero/The Clothesline Project—a collaborative installation by artist Mónica Mayer designed to spark conversation about women’s experiences with harassment and violence.

Following recent reports of sexual harassment in the art world, Artsy interviewed women who came up in the art world in the ’60s, ’70s, and ’80s—including artist Betty Tompkins—about their experiences with sexism and harassment over the course of their careers. Artist Natalie Frank wrote an ARTnews article titled “For Women Artists, the Art World Can Be a Minefield.”

NPR interviewed Tippi Hedren, Melanie Griffith, and Dakota Johnson—three generations of actresses—about their experiences with harassment in Hollywood.

“This recent calling out of sexual assault has been a long time coming,” says comedian Sarah Silverman in a monologue for her Hulu show. “It’s good. . . . it’s complicated and it is gonna hurt, but it’s necessary and we’ll all be healthier for it.”

Front-Page Femmes

Three women were among the 2017 National Book Award winners, including Jesmyn Ward, Masha Gessen, and Robin Benway. Ward is the first woman to ever receive the award twice.

Kerstin Brätsch wins the Munch Museum’s Edvard Munch Art Award.

Emily Kame Kngwarreye’s painting Earth’s Creation 1 broke its own auction record, selling for $2.1 million.

Art Basel Miami Beach will include an all-woman art fair, titled “Fair.

Painter Jordan Casteel reflects on the complex dynamic between herself and her subjects.

Dominique Fung’s paintings have a “magical, slick glazed feel.”

Kelly Reemtsen paints images of anonymous women in thick impasto, juxtaposing high fashion with construction equipment.

Carrie Mae Weems will present a gathering of artists and activists to examine histories of violence and how they have impacted American society.

art21 explores Tala Madani’s sketchbooks.

The Art for Justice Fund, founded by Agnes Gund, hopes to reduce prison populations by 20% over the next five years.

NPR interviews actress Greta Gerwig about her directorial debut, Lady Bird.

Khadijah Queen’s latest book of poetry is “an investigation of celebrity culture and toxic masculinity that moves at a lyrical sprint.”

A new biography of Paula Modersohn-Becker “sparkles with details of Becker’s close friendships and artistic training.”

Shows We Want to See

Sable Elyse Smith’s solo exhibition at the Queens Museum, Ordinary Violence, is “marked by her father’s 19-year incarceration—the majority of her life—which has left an indelible absence.”

Del Kathryn Barton’s exhibition The Highway is a Disco explores themes of childhood, womanhood, and nature.

Nan Goldin: Family History, on view at the Portland Museum of Art, “offers audiences a kaleidoscopic narrative of the breadth of the human experience.”

Dana Awartani uses mathematical principles and traditional Islamic patterning in her works on view at the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit.

—Emily Haight is the digital editorial associate at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Artist Spotlight: Nanette Carter

Magnetic Fields: Expanding American Abstraction, 1960s to Today places abstract works by multiple generations of black women artists in context with one another—and within the larger history of abstract art—for the first time, revealing the artists’ role as under-recognized leaders in abstraction.

Illumination #1 (1984)

Nanette Carter (b. 1954, Columbus, Ohio)

A self-titled “scapeologist,” Nanette Carter specializes in crafting fictional landscapes of outer space and the ocean, sky, and earth. Through visual world-building, Carter finds a way to simultaneously critique the drama of humankind and pay homage to the persistence of the natural world. For Carter, the imagined realm serves as a framework in which “the necessity of war and the horrors of injustice” can be fused to “the mysteries of nature and human nature.”

Illumination #1 is the first in a series of 49 works, all created between 1984 and 1986. The series was inspired by Carter’s first trip to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, where she became fascinated with the blend of European Catholic and African Yoruba faiths. Carter’s sharp, rhythmic mark-making references the music of Rio, the pulse of the city that Carter became enamored with. Shapes fit together with distinct sense of motion in Illumination #1, recalling celebration and festivity.

Nanette Carter, Cantilevered #14, from the series “Cantilevered,” 2014; Oil on Mylar, 30 x 37 in.; N’Namdi Contemporary Gallery, Miami, Florida; © Nanette Carter; Photo courtesy of the artist

From 1997 onward, Carter has worked exclusively on frosted Mylar, a type of plastic sheet developed by DuPont during the 1950s. By using Mylar, Carter achieves a unique “luminosity, density, and transparency” in her artwork—particularly true in Cantilevered #14 (2014), Carter’s second work on view in Magnetic Fields. Part of a series of 37, “cantilever” is an architectural term referring to a rigid support beam anchored only on one end. In Cantilevered #14, nebulous blocks of color and texture are invisibly suspended in a pool of transparent Mylar. The almost precarious stack of shapes calls to mind the delicate balance of family, friends, work, health, news, and social media in the 21st century, as well as the support nets necessary to maintain it.

Visit the museum and explore Magnetic Fields, on view through January 21, 2018. Learn more through the Magnetic Fields Mobile Guide.

—Ilayda Orankoy is the 2017 fall publications and communications/marketing intern at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Hung Liu: Restoring Memory

Born in 1948, a year before the Chinese Communist party came to power, Hung Liu grew up in an environment that discouraged apolitical personal expression. Although she received training in socialist realism, Liu delighted in painting landscapes and drawing portraits based on photos, both unsanctioned forms of expression under the Maoist regime. It was only when Liu immigrated to America that she began to experiment with art’s potential beyond the realm of realistic representation.

Hung Liu, Shan-Mountain, 2012; Color aquatint etching with gold leaf, 47 x 36 in.; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Promised Gift of Steven Scott, Baltimore; © Hung Liu; Photo by Lee Stalsworth

Liu’s best-known works are paintings based on historical photographs. Re-creating the images in an enlarged format, she transforms humble documents into large, vivid portraits. Perhaps in rebellion against her training, Liu rejects the rigid realism of Chinese art of the post-Mao era. Instead, she embraces traditional conventions of Chinese painting that value energetic, expressive line work. She uses a restorative process in her work, layering bright colors over the black-and-white original images as well as decorative textures and whimsical forms from classical paintings. She often drips linseed oil over the canvas to create a hazy veil that hints at the muddled refractions of history and memory. By focusing on her subjects, Liu dignifies and humanizes these nameless faces of history. In lieu of capturing their precise historical context, she enhances the mysterious aura lent to them by the passage of time.

Liu imbues unlikely subjects with an awesome presence, as seen in her works on view at NMWA. On a 1991 trip to China, Liu discovered a collection of old photographs depicting unnamed prostitutes. In Shan-Mountain (2012) and Shui-Water (2012) she extracts these women from their source photos and presents them, magnified in scope, in dramatic portraits. Her focus on restoring their integrity as people over restoring the images as historical artifacts indicates a deep engagement with the humanity of her subjects. Once again, her vivid palette not only brings them to life, but endows the women with an air of nobility that suggests they might be royal concubines, or even empresses.

Hung Liu, Shui-Water, 2012; Color aquatint etching with gold leaf, 47 x 36 in.; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Promised Gift of Steven Scott, Baltimore; © Hung Liu; Photo by Lee Stalsworth

The names of the paintings themselves allude to the Chinese name for landscape paintings (shan shui hua, literally “mountain river paintings”) where towering mountains and sweeping rivers dwarf the occupants of the land. Although she imitates the aesthetics of landscape painting, Liu ultimately subverts their focus. Rather than emphasizing nature’s grandeur, she asserts the dignity of these individuals. By blending Western portraiture with Chinese landscape painting, Liu casts her subjects as monumental figures that stand independent of time or place. History may pick and choose who to remember, the paintings seem to say, but the integrity of the human spirit will thrive regardless.

—Xiaoxiao Meng was the summer 2017 publications and communications/marketing intern at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Artist Spotlight: Maren Hassinger

Magnetic Fields: Expanding American Abstraction, 1960s to Today places abstract works by multiple generations of black women artists in context with one another—and within the larger history of abstract art—for the first time, revealing the artists’ role as under-recognized leaders in abstraction.

Wrenching News (2008) 

Maren Hassinger (b. 1947 in Los Angeles, California)

“I want my work to offer an experience to look and to see, to contemplate,” says sculptor and performance artist Maren Hassinger. With a career that has spanned over four decades, Hassinger continues to create works that invite viewers to contemplate issues of nature, culture, and identity. Hassinger’s abstract sculpture Wrenching News, on view in Magnetic Fields, explores such themes.

Hassinger began her artistic career at Bennington College in Vermont in 1965, where she planned to pursue a degree in dance but ultimately decided to focus on the visual arts. After receiving her degree in sculpture, Hassinger received her MFA at UCLA. The course of her career changed after she took a class in weaving, and she began to experiment with the malleability and texture of fiber when creating sculptures. Hassinger’s fascination with the transformative qualities of unconventional materials continued to grow.

Her six-square-diameter floor sculpture Wrenching News is an embodiment of these interests. Hassinger twisted and coiled together hundreds of strips of newspaper into a veil. Inspired by the events and aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the artist used pages from The New York Times. Hassinger employs newspaper as a medium because of the relevant stories it contains. She explains, “The New York Times, in particular, has incredible international coverage and so that use of the newspaper is like saying this is about the world.”

Maren Hassinger, Wrenching News (detail), 2008; Shredded, twisted, and wrapped New York Times newspapers, 12 x 72 x 72 in.; Courtesy of the artist, New York, New York; © Maren Hassinger

The twisting of the material comes from the artist’s background in weaving and working with textiles. The busy, complex appearance of her work calls to mind the sociopolitical challenges that can arise from the devastation caused by a natural disaster. At the same time, the work sparks conversation about how tragedy and suffering are part of the human experience.

The work’s positioning on the floor encourages viewers to remember that sometimes devastating global events can spur society to grow, endure, and become more resilient. As the director of the Rinehart School of Sculpture at the Maryland Institute College of Art, Hassinger emphasizes the importance of “empowering people through art so they can be empowered to change things.”

Visit the museum and explore Magnetic Fields, on view through January 21, 2018. Learn more through the Magnetic Fields Mobile Guide.

—Katie Benz is the 2017 fall digital engagement intern at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.