Art Fix Friday: July 21, 2017

A new £10 of Jane Austen was revealed on the 200th anniversary of her death. Austen is the first woman writer to be featured on British currency.

The Los Angeles Times reports that the note also features images of Queen Elizabeth II, Austen’s writing desk, her brother’s house, Godmersham Park, and Elizabeth Bennet. The Guardian comments on the note’s featured quote, an ironic line from Pride and Prejudice attributed to the character Caroline Bingley.

Front-Page Femmes

The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts acquired 32 works of art, including work by Joan Semmel and Elizabeth Okie Paxton.

Karen Okonkwo founded a new stock photography website to combat negative portrayals of black culture.

The University of Chicago Library receives a gift of nearly 500 never-before-shown Vivian Maier photographs.

Frances Gabe, known as the inventor of the self-cleaning home, died at the age of 101.

artnet explores the controversy surrounding Käthe Kollwitz’s socially engaged artwork.

Artsy celebrates Niki de Saint Phalle’s Tarot Garden, a 14-acre park populated by mystical goddess sculptures in Tuscany.

The New Yorker discusses the work of German painter Charlotte Salomon, killed in the Holocaust, whose art has been overshadowed by her life and times.

Following news of the first woman cast as the lead in the BBC television show Doctor Who, the Huffington Post applauds the increased representation of strong women in the sci-fi genre.

Nontsikelelo Mutiti’s books designs explore African identity, police brutality, and the aesthetics of hair braiding.

Maia Evrona, a recipient of a 2016 NEA grant for poetry translation, discusses how eliminating NEA grants would have a detrimental impact on the arts.

The Huffington Post interviews Broad City actress Abi Jacobson about hosting A Piece of Work, a podcast collaboration between WNYC studios and MoMA.

Artsy highlights ten women artists who helped pioneer the Land Art movement, although they never reached the same level of fame as their male counterparts.

“We live in a ‘post-truth’ world, and the truth remains difficult to find,” says Maja Bajevic.

Shows We Want to See

Sarah Lucas challenges conventions of representation in Auguste Rodin’s works with a contemporary female perspective, on view at the Legion of Honor Museum.

Teresa Burga’s exhibition at SculptureCenter “reminds viewers how narrow the contemporary art canon is, how male-driven, and how predominately focused on American and European artists.”

“Outsider artist” Beverly Buchanan’s sculpted houses are at home in Detroit, representing a longing for and connection destroyed or abandoned landscapes.

ARTnews describes Carol Rama: Antibodies at the New Museum “a show about unspeakable desires and screwed-up psychologies—everything that can’t be talked about.”

—Emily Haight is the digital editorial assistant at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Delicate & Dangerous: Cathy de Monchaux

In celebration of NMWA’s 30th anniversary, and inspired by the museum’s focus on contemporary women artists as catalysts for change, Revival illuminates how women working in sculpture, photography, and video use spectacle and scale for expressive effect.

Cathy de Monchaux, Clearing the Tracks Before They Appear, 1994; Mixed media, 33 x 33 x 3 in.; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Gift of Heather and Tony Podesta Collection; © Cathy de Monchaux; Photo by Lee Stalsworth

Cathy de Monchaux, Clearing the Tracks Before They Appear, 1994; Mixed media, 33 x 33 x 3 in.; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Gift of Heather and Tony Podesta Collection; © Cathy de Monchaux; Photo by Lee Stalsworth

Cathy de Monchaux (b. 1960, London, England)

Although at first glance Cathy de Monchaux’s work seems to mimic bodily forms, closer inspection reveals an act of fusion at work. With obsessive attention to detail, de Monchaux joins soft, vulnerable, seemingly organic components with sharp metallic points or hooks. The marriage of paradoxical materials elicits contradictory feelings from her audience. While the flesh-like material evokes an uncomfortable recognition, the cruel, protruding metals inspire an awed fear; if the soft, voluptuous shapes summon lust, the jutting spikes repulse empathy. 

The Artist’s Voice:

“I use the erotic as a metaphor for angst. A lot of people’s angst comes from how they relate to other human beings, and a lot of that is to do with attraction and repulsion. Every relationship becomes fraught after the first burst of enthusiasm, and I suppose I use the whole erotic thing as a metaphor for that fraught-ness.”—Cathy de Monchaux, in an interview with The Telegraph

Revival Highlight:

Rather than rely on representation, de Monchaux uses the power of suggestion to draw in her viewer, promising manifold possibilities within a singular form. Her luxurious wall pieces Don’t Touch My Waist (1998) and Clearing the Tracks Before They Appear (1994) lure the viewer in with appearances evocative of sumptuous, feminine clothing. But the former’s jagged hooks and the latter’s subtle metal teeth keep any would-be-wearers at bay, promising pain in place of any decorative pleasure that might otherwise be derived. Blending pain and pleasure, distance and proximity, injury and protection, de Monchaux simultaneously evokes the joys and the fears of femininity, revealing how eroticism encompasses the whole spectrum of danger and safety.

Cathy de Monchaux, Red, 1999; Brass, copper, velvet, leather, canvas, steel, graphite, and thread, 14 x 46 x 34 in.; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Gift of Heather and Tony Podesta Collection; © Cathy de Monchaux; Photo by Lee Stalsworth

Cathy de Monchaux, Red, 1999; Brass, copper, velvet, leather, canvas, steel, graphite, and thread, 14 x 46 x 34 in.; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Gift of Heather and Tony Podesta Collection; © Cathy de Monchaux; Photo by Lee Stalsworth

A floor sculpture featured in Revival, Red (1999), contains fewer elements of dangerous elegance, opting instead for a more subtle approach. It appears less threatening and direct than both hanging works, lacking sharp blades or hooks. Instead the work contains a cascading center that blossoms into tender, fleshy velvet folds. But for all its sumptuousness, the central structure seems contained within the base, suggesting constriction that the surrounding belts only complement. Red’s foreboding presence underscores de Monchaux’s capacity for creating disquieting work in all shapes and forms.

Visit the museum and explore Revival, on view through September 10, 2017.

—Xiaoxiao Meng is the 2017 publications and communications/marketing intern at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Reading Between the Lines: Fanny Sanín

The exhibition Equilibrium: Fanny Sanín, on view through October 29, 2017, presents studies and finished paintings by abstract artist Fanny Sanín (b. 1938, Bogotá, Colombia). The exhibition features compositions on paper and canvas spanning 56 years of the artist’s career.

Installation view of Equilibrium: Fanny Sanín

Installation view of Equilibrium: Fanny Sanín

Sanín began her artistic practice at the University of the Andes before attending the University of Illinois, and the Chelsea School of Art and the Central School of Art in London. She moved to the U.S. in 1971 and currently lives in New York and travels regularly to Bogotá.

Sanín’s practice focuses on geometric structure, color, order, and harmony; all elements she executes meticulously on both small and large surfaces. After her exposure to abstract art during her final years in school, she chose to pursue abstraction as a way to focus on color and form.

Fanny Sanín , Composition No. 1, 2016; Acrylic and pencil on paper, 25 1/2 x 40 in.

Fanny Sanín, Composition No. 1, 2016; Acrylic and pencil on paper, 25 1/2 x 40 in.; Courtesy of the artist

Through the range of works featured in the exhibition, viewers gain insight into Sanín’s artistic process—just as remarkable as her finished products. Creating between four and eighteen studies before working on a final composition, Sanín refines her color choices and structure, altering minute details to convey her intended meaning.

Fanny Sanín, Small Study No. 4, 1973; Gouache on paper; Courtesy of the artist

Fanny Sanín, Small Study No. 4, 1973; Gouache on paper; Courtesy of the artist

In a series of four small studies from 1973, Sanín primarily paints vertical lines of different weights and colors, stimulating visual interest through the juxtaposition of complementary and contrasting colors. These studies mark a pivotal transition in Sanín’s art toward her signature color-blocking technique. Her more recent studies and finished paintings demonstrate the maturity of her color palette and her eye for symmetry, order, and balance. The exhibition also displays some of the artist’s early works in watercolor from 1960, 1961, and 1968, in which she worked in a more gestural abstract style before turning to geometric abstraction.

These non-objective abstract works by Sanín demonstrate her intellectual creativity and curiosity. Historically, women artists were judged to be most skilled at copying the natural world rather than inventing original compositions. Even in the field of abstract art, they have been seen as imitators or followers of their male peers. The significant and dynamic contributions of women such as  Sanín to abstraction have only recently begun to be fully recognized.

This exhibition explores abstraction from the preliminary stages of the artist’s process to the final works. Equilibrium: Fanny Sanín is on view in the Teresa Lozano Long Gallery of the National Museum of Women in the Arts. Visit the museum to see Sanín’s works in person!

—Roseline Odhiambo is the summer 2017 digital engagement intern at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Wonder Women in the NMWA Library

This summer the blockbuster film Wonder Woman has already earned more than $724 million. The NMWA Library and Research Center staff could not resist swinging their own golden lasso by presenting Wonder Women!, a celebration of women who are fearless, adventurous, and larger than life. Drawn from the wide-ranging holdings of the library’s special collections, this exhibition features women of both fact and fiction demonstrating great bravery and taking action against the wrongs of the world.

The Wonder Women! exhibition was inspired by the NMWA Library’s recent acquisition of the first regular monthly issue of the feminist Ms. magazine, founded by Gloria Steinem and Dorothy Pittman Hughes, which hit newsstands in July 1972. In an effort to visually differentiate Ms. from other women’s magazines, the staff selected an image of Wonder Woman for the cover, fighting for “peace and justice in ’72.”

Cover of the first regular monthly issue of Ms. magazine

The illustration was by Murphy Anderson, a longtime artist for DC Comics. The banner “Wonder Woman for President” likely references Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm’s bid for the Democratic Party’s nomination for president that year. Anderson also reflects the country’s anxiety about the war in Vietnam as a giant Wonder Woman strides with urgency down a main street in America, rescuing part of the town with her golden lasso, while shielding the street from a raging jungle battlefield placed uncomfortably close behind the shop fronts.

The cover was also timely as a reboot of the Wonder Woman comic book was due to be published in 1973—this time with its first woman editor, Dorothy Woolfolk. Ms. magazine featured Wonder Woman on the cover again for its 40th anniversary issue in 2012. The 2012 issue featured Wonder Woman bounding down Pennsylvania Avenue, the site of famous women’s rights marches for more than a century.

The article inside, “Wonder Woman Revisited” by Joanne Edgar, quotes the character’s originator, Charles Moulton: “Wonder Woman has force bound by love and, with her strength, represents what every woman should be and really is. She corrects evil and brings happiness. Wonder Woman proves that women are superior to men because they have love in addition to force.” The combination of strength and love is apparent in the materials featured in Wonder Woman!, from Judy Chicago shedding the patriarchy of her given name, to lighthouse keeper Grace Darling who risked her life on a night in 1838 to save victims of a shipwreck.

Visit NMWA’s Betty Boyd Dettre Library and Research Center to celebrate the legacy of wonder women!

—Sarah Osborne Bender is the director of the Betty Boyd Dettre Library and Research Center at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Art Fix Friday: July 14, 2017

MoMA and WNYC Studios released the first episodes of the podcast A Piece of Work, hosted by Broad City star Abbi Jacobson. The podcast features Jacobson in conversation with museum curators and artists, as well as celebrity guests like Questlove, RuPaul, and Tavi Gevinson.

Focusing on a different theme in each episode, the down-to-earth podcast delves into some of the most frequently asked questions about modern art, highlighting the ways in which the works discussed are remarkable. New episodes are available every Monday and Wednesday.

Front-Page Femmes

Google Doodle celebrates Japanese designer Eiko Ishioka on her 79th birthday.

The Los Angeles Times describes Analia Saban’s work as a “delicious, delirious, mind-bending experience.”

Morgan O’Hara hand copied the U.S. Constitution as her own personal form of artistic protest.

Colette Fu will build the biggest pop-up book in the world inside the Philadelphia Photo Arts Center.

Filmmaker Leanne Anderson worked with Google and the National Film Board of Canada to make Bear 71 VR, an interactive documentary tracking the life of one grizzly bear.

A letter written by Jane Austen in 1812, in which she criticizes another novelist, sold for more than $200,000 at auction.

Zanele Muholi’s series of 365 self-portraits express her personal experiences as well as media reports dealing with hate crimes and oppression.

The New Yorker reflects on Talking to Women, a short book of the edited transcripts of conversations that novelist and screenwriter Nell Dunn had with nine of her friends, published in 1965.

Illustrator Tove Jansson’s retrospective showcases 150 works that trace her career, from surrealist-inspired paintings to satirical cartoons.

Marion Belanger investigates landscapes along the San Andreas Fault and the Mid-Atlantic Rift.

Director Reed Morano discusses the aesthetic and direction of The Handmaid’s Tale TV series, which was recently nominated for 13 Emmy awards.

The Atlantic explores the geological term roche moutonnée to describe glacial mountains. The article illustrates the term—often translated as “sheepback”—by using Rosa Bonheur’s painting Sheep by the Sea, in NMWA’s collection.

Dancer and choreographer Okwui Okpokwasili discusses a documentary about her breakout solo performance.

Shows We Want to See

Whitechapel Gallery features Max Mara Art Prize winner Emma Hart’s new large-scale installation. The exhibition is the result of the artist’s time in Italy studying family psychology and the tradition of maiolica, tin-glazed pottery made in Faenza since the 14th century.

Bustle shares its takeaways from NSFW: Female Gaze, an exhibition at the Museum of Sex in New York City. The show features work by 20 women artists who interpret the female gaze.

Promises to Keep features self-portraiture and performance art by 12 Pakistani women artists.

The exhibition Black Women Artists for Black Lives Matter explores the visibility and camouflage of the black female experience.

—Emily Haight is the digital editorial assistant at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Mixed Media Majesty: Petah Coyne

In celebration of NMWA’s 30th anniversary, and inspired by the museum’s focus on contemporary women artists as catalysts for change, Revival illuminates how women working in sculpture, photography, and video use spectacle and scale for expressive effect.

Installation view of Petah Coyne’s Untitled #781 (1994); Photo: Yassine El Mansouri

Installation view of Petah Coyne’s Untitled #781 (1994); Photo: Yassine El Mansouri

Petah Coyne (b. 1953, Oklahoma City)

Called the “queen of mixed media,” Petah Coyne creates attention-grabbing sculptural works and photographs. Examples of both are on view in Revival. Her sculptures incorporate unusual materials like wax, sand, silk flowers, and taxidermy animals. Coyne’s massive forms are often seen suspended from the ceiling or snaking up gallery walls. She breathes new life into objects that may not otherwise be used, and incorporates obscured forms of the human body. Coyne spends years with each piece, and her creative process is as mysterious to her as the works themselves appear to viewers.

The Artist’s Voice:

“When material seems devoid of life, of possibility, I want even more to make something of it. I have an obsessive attraction to these kinds of materials. They are functionless yet carry all sorts of associations and memories.”—Petah Coyne, interview with Carrie Pryzbilla

“All of my pieces seem fragile. But that is deceiving, because they’re all begun with steel understructures. Yet I want each one to look incredibly delicate and to have that feminine sense of appearing soft and seductive. But as any number of women have shown, we have an internal strength and drive that is hard to fathom.”—Petah Coyne, interview in Sculpture Magazine

Installation view of Petah Coyne’s Untitled #1287 (Tati) (2009); Photo: Yassine El Mansouri

Revival Highlight:

Revival features sculptural and photographic work by Coyne that can evoke a range of emotions. Her photograph Untitled #885 (Saucer Baby) (1997) evokes feelings of playfulness, like the child in the pool, but also has a haunting quality. The intrigue and extravagance of the layers of wax and other media in her large-scale works Untitled #1287 (Tati) (2009) and Untitled #781 (1994) jog memories and form new associations in the viewer’s mind.

Untitled #1287 (Tati) features a taxidermy goose diving into a swirl of deep purple velvet and wax-dipped silk flowers. Coyne’s use of a stuffed bird and fake flowers recall associations with the past-life of “dead” objects. Lush and dramatic, Coyne’s work presents a spectacle that grabs and holds the viewer’s gaze.

Visit the museum and explore Revival, on view through September 10, 2017.

—Meghan Masius was the spring 2017 publications and communications/marketing intern at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Artist Spotlight: Patricia Tobacco Forrester

Revel in the beauty of nature captured by Patricia Tobacco Forrester (1940–2011) in her large-scale watercolor works on view at NMWA. The artist’s work is characterized by expansive compositions filled with vibrant hues.

Forester’s affinity for nature began at a young age. A New England native, Forrester grew up on a small farm in Western Massachusetts. She received a Bachelor of Arts from Smith College in 1962. Originally a printmaker, Forrester studied under sculptor and graphic artist Leonard Baskin and later received a Master of Fine Arts from Yale University in 1965.

Patricia Tobacco Forrester, Bronzed Roses, 1991; Watercolor, 40 x 60 in.; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Promised Gift of Steven Scott, Baltimore, in Memory of the Artist; © The Estate of Patricia Tobacco Forrester

Patricia Tobacco Forrester, Bronzed Roses, 1991; Watercolor, 40 x 60 in.; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Promised Gift of Steven Scott, Baltimore, in Memory of the Artist; © The Estate of Patricia Tobacco Forrester

Forrester produced some of her best known works in Washington, D.C, where she lived for nearly 30 years. She painted almost exclusively outdoors, finding inspiration in neighborhood parks and gardens around the city, including the National Arboretum. She once said, “I think I know almost every tree and flower there.” For Forrester’s artistic practice, working from photographs was not sufficient. She preferred painting en plein air, because of the wealth of visual information provided in nature. Light also played a key role in her work. When choosing a location to paint, the artist focused on areas with a dramatic interplay of light with surrounding trees and vegetation.

NMWA visitor gazes at Barbados (left) and Bronzed Roses (right); Photo: Madeline Barnes, NMWA

A visitor gazes at Patricia Tobacco Forrester’s Barbados (1995) at the left and Bronzed Roses (1991) at the right; Photo: Madeline Barnes, NMWA

Unconcerned with realistic depictions, Forrester enjoyed inconsistencies and distortions in her work. She often described her paintings as abstract and enjoyed the “accidental nature of watercolor” as a medium. She dove into each scene with little to no preparatory sketching. This technique allowed her pieces to evolve naturally, influenced both by the natural properties of her watercolors and by her personal response to her surroundings.

During the winter months, when D.C. weather was not conducive to working outside, Forrester often ventured to more tropical locales. One of her favorite destinations outside of the D.C. area was Costa Rica. Her work from abroad depicts lush and intricate rainforest scenes, integrating components from a multitude of sites. Forrester masterfully created vibrant, layered compositions.

Visit NMWA to see two of Forrester’s large-scale watercolors, Bronzed Roses (1991) and Barbados (1995), on view in the third floor galleries.

Caroline Cress was the spring 2017 development events intern at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Art Fix Friday: July 7, 2017

In celebration of the all-women exhibition at White Cube Bermondsey, Dreamers Awake, Artsy explores the pivotal role that women have played in Surrealism.

“As the female body became the ultimate Surrealist object, it was mystified, fetishized, and othered,” writes Artsy. The exhibition features artists who confronted the perception of women as muses or seductresses and includes women Surrealists working today.

Front-Page Femmes

The Association of Art Museum Directors (AAMD) released a survey for 2017, including findings that show that although “the museum field has outpaced national salary growth rates, it also shows the vast disparities in compensation between different sectors of the museum industry.”

Hundreds of people congregated at the Dallas Museum of Art in an attempt to set a record for the largest gathering of people dressed like Frida Kahlo.

In anticipation of Yael Bartana’s upcoming film and performance project, What if Women Ruled the World, the Guardian asks women artists, writers, and leaders to envision a woman-led future.

Sophal Neak explores Cambodian culture and traditions through her photographic portraits.

A Boston mural by Ann Lewis amplifies the voices of incarcerated women.

Sydney-based artist Niharika Hukku translates finely detailed illustrations into painted ceramics.

Photographer Diane Tuft captures haunting images of the disappearing Arctic landscape.

Artsy features Surrealist Dora Maar, whose career was overshadowed by her lover Picasso.

Hyperallergic interviews Françoise Mouly and Nadja Spiegelman, the creators of the comics newspaper RESIST!.

A Boston mural by Ann Lewis amplifies the voices of incarcerated women.

Artsy highlights the women who helped establish iconic New York museums and galleries, yet whose contributions have been largely forgotten.

Iranian-born artist Sanam Khatibi re-imagines Renaissance paintings with women embracing power, violence, and sensuality.

A series of plates depicting famous women, part of a dinner service by Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant, is up for sale.

Artsy features Surrealist Dora Maar, whose career was overshadowed by her lover Picasso.

Costume designer Stacey Battat discusses her costume choices, design, and research for Sophia Coppola’s latest film, The Beguiled.

Shows We Want to See

In Lynette Yiadom-Boakye: Under-Song for a Cipher, on view at the New Museum, the artist “updates art’s oldest medium with an expert hand and a bracingly new message.”

The city of Wroclaw stages a retrospective of recently deceased artist Magdalena Abakanowicz, whose work is also currently on view at NMWA.

O’Keeffe, Preston, Cossington Smith: making modernism is on view at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, featuring more than 90 works by the 20th-century trailblazers. “These three in their own way had the courage to trust their convictions, understand the past but not be restrained by it. That’s a rebellious act,” says the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum’s senior director.

—Emily Haight is the digital editorial assistant at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Hair’s the Thing: Sonya Clark

In celebration of NMWA’s 30th anniversary, and inspired by the museum’s focus on contemporary women artists as catalysts for change, Revival illuminates how women working in sculpture, photography, and video use spectacle and scale for expressive effect.

Sonya Clark (b. 1967, Washington, D.C.)

Sonya Clark, Cotton to Hair, 2012; Cotton and human hair, 14 1/2 x 12 1/2 x 5 in.; Tony Podesta Collection, Washington, D.C.; © Sonya Clark; Photo by Lee Stalsworth

Sonya Clark, Cotton to Hair, 2012; Cotton and human hair, 14 1/2 x 12 1/2 x 5 in.; Tony Podesta Collection, Washington, D.C.; © Sonya Clark; Photo by Lee Stalsworth

Sonya Clark is a multimedia and textile artist of Afro-Caribbean descent based in Richmond, Virginia. Clark’s maternal grandparents, a tailor and a woodworker, and cultural background inspired her interest in the arts and her use of non-traditional materials.

Her works explore racial identity and the connotations assigned to various everyday objects, as well as the double meaning these objects can hold for African American communities. Working with combs, money, flags, and—most strikingly—human hair, Clark examines the intricacies of African American identity. She often uses these quotidian materials to create portraits of prominent black figures from American history, including Madame C.J. Walker and Barack Obama.

The Artist’s Voice:

“I am instinctively drawn to objects that connect to my personal narrative as a point of departure: a comb, a piece of cloth, a penny, or hair. . . . I question these collective meanings. My stories, your stories, our stories are held in the object. In this way, the everyday ‘thing’ becomes a lens through which we may better see one another.”—Sonya Clark, artist statement

“Here’s one of the things about hair—it brings us together, our DNA is in our hair; we spend a fair amount of time primping ourselves. Hair becomes one of those things we can look racially past ourselves. It’s a way in which we’re all connected to our ancestors; hair brings us together and it separates us.”—Sonya Clark, interview in The Roanoker

Sonya Clark, Hair Wreath, 2012; Human hair and wire, 13 x 13 x 2 in.; Tony Podesta Collection, Washington, D.C.; © Sonya Clark; Photo by Lee Stalsworth

Sonya Clark, Hair Wreath, 2012; Human hair and wire, 13 x 13 x 2 in.; Tony Podesta Collection, Washington, D.C.; © Sonya Clark; Photo by Lee Stalsworth

Revival Highlight:

Two works by Clark, Hair Wreath (2012) and Cotton to Hair (2012) are on view in Revival. In both Clark incorporates human hair to reflect on racial identity and cultural prejudices. By using wire to bind strands of dark hair, Clark’s Hair Wreath can be seen as an adornment—much like hair itself is often decorative.

Using human hair to question social issues exemplifies Revival’s theme of artists manipulating scale and spectacle in order to achieve the desired expressive effect in their works. By combining the recognizable forms of both hair and a wreath in an unexpected juxtaposition, Clark holds the viewer’s attention. One of the smaller works in the exhibition, Hair Wreath encourages audiences to look closer, which may lead to a deeper examination of their own relationship to the work.

Visit the museum and explore Revival, on view through September 10, 2017.

—Meghan Masius was the spring 2017 publications and communications/marketing intern at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Not So Itsy Bitsy: Louise Bourgeois

In celebration of NMWA’s 30th anniversary, and inspired by the museum’s focus on contemporary women artists as catalysts for change, Revival illuminates how women working in sculpture, photography, and video use spectacle and scale for expressive effect.

Installation view of Louise Bourgeois’s Topiary, 2006 by work by Anna Gaskell (left) and Deborah Paauwe (right); Photo: Emily Haight, NMWA

Installation view of Louise Bourgeois’s Topiary, 2006, in front of photographs by Anna Gaskell (left) and Deborah Paauwe (right); Photo: Emily Haight, NMWA

Louise Bourgeois (b. 1911, Paris, d. 2010, New York)

Louise Bourgeois paved the way for women artists and sculptors throughout her long career. She began studying art after the death of her mother in 1932. She began producing large-scale sculptures shortly after moving to New York in the late 1930s. After decades of work, Bourgeois gained recognition when, in 1982 at the age of 70, she received a retrospective at MoMA. Following the exhibition, institutions around the world acquired Bourgeois’s works and she received international acclaim for the last 30 years of her career.

The Artist’s Voice:

“The spiders were an ode to my mother. She was a tapestry woman, and like a spider, was a weaver. She protected me and was my best friend.”

“I want to create my own architecture so that the relationships of my forms and objects are fixed. Sometimes I need the large scale so that the person can literally move in relationship to the form. The difference between the real space and the psychological space interests me and I want to explore both. For example, the spiders, which are portraits of my mother, are large because she was a monument to me. I want to walk around and be underneath her and feel her protection.”—Louise Bourgeois, interview in The Guardian

Louise Bourgeois, Spider III, 1995; Bronze, 19 x 33 x 33 in.; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Gift of Wilhelmina Cole Holladay; Art © The Easton Foundation/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Louise Bourgeois, Spider III, 1995; Bronze, 19 x 33 x 33 in.; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Gift of Wilhelmina Cole Holladay; Art © The Easton Foundation/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Revival Highlight:

Revival features three sculptures by Bourgeois, situated in the exhibition’s three central themes of the body, the child, and other creatures. Topiary (2006) represents a pre-pubescent female figure with a seed head. Another sculpture, Clutching Hands (1990), depicts a balloon-like pair of carved hands atop a marble block. The exhibition also includes one of her signature spider forms, Spider III (1995), recently acquired by NMWA.

The resurgence of the spider in Bourgeois’s sculptures from the mid-1990s, including Spider III, is evidence of the lasting importance this creature had in the artist’s imagination. Bourgeois associated the spider with protectiveness and frequently remarked that her mother, Joséphine, shared spiders’ admirable attributes of patience, industriousness and cleverness. Although Bourgeois saw a nurturing quality in spiders, she understood that they can evoke a fearful response in others. The cast-bronze medium allowed her to create a rough surface texture that gives this creature a dynamic quality, capturing spiders’ characteristic skittering motion.

Visit the museum and explore Revival, on view through September 10, 2017.

—Meghan Masius was the spring 2017 publications and communications/marketing intern at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.