Urgent Museum Notice

Publications

Explore publications highlighting women in the arts.

NMWA produces print materials that illuminate the work and lives of contemporary and historical women artists; highlight the collection, special exhibitions, and programs; and center women in the history of art. Our institutional magazine, Women in the Arts, is published three times per year. Other publications include exhibition catalogues and brochures, books, annual reports, and the Broad Strokes blog.

Explore Publications

Books

Learn about the museum’s books and special exhibition catalogues and buy them in our shop.

Magazines

The museum’s award-winning magazine, Women in the Arts, is published three times per year. It features museum news, information about current and upcoming exhibitions, artist interviews, collection highlights, and more.

Annual Reports

Read about the museum’s achievements and the growth of our programs, partnerships, and collection over the years.

From the Blog

Related Posts

  • 5 Fast Facts: Zanele Muholi

    Posted: Jun 29, 2020 in 5 Fast Facts
    Impress your friends with five fast facts about artist Zanele Muholi, whose work is on view in NMWA’s collection galleries.
    Blog Category:  5 Fast Facts
  • Art Fix Friday: June 26, 2020

    Posted: Jun 26, 2020 in Art Fix Friday
    Yesomi Umolu, artistic director of the 2019 Chicago Architecture Biennial, explores what museums must internalize before moving forward with equity work; BmoreArt examines NMWA’s “visionary” collecting practices; and more.
    A black-and-white photograph of a light-skinned adult woman holding a newspaper with news about World War II. She wears a coat and her short, curly hair is caught in the wind.
    Blog Category:  Art Fix Friday
  • 5 Fast Facts: Chakaia Booker

    Posted: Jun 24, 2020 in 5 Fast Facts
    Impress your friends with five fast facts about Chakaia Booker, whose work is on view in NMWA’s collection galleries.
    A large metal sculpture stands in the middle of the street, similar to an empty rectangular picture frame. The “frame” is crowded with undulating, coiling metal sculptural elements that occasionally end in spikes. Behind stand three vertical twisting, net-like metal sculptures.
    Blog Category:  5 Fast Facts