Urgent Museum Notice

Border Crossing Audio Guide

Against a stark white background are seven small clay vessels painted a dark, shiny black. They look like miniature plastic water bottles and are each slightly bent, making them appear like a gathering of people interacting.
Enjoy an audio companion to Border Crossing.

Enrich your experience of Border Crossing: Jami Porter Lara by hearing from the artist herself. Porter Lara discusses the trip that inspired the work, as well as her philosophy of making.

Curator’s Introduction

Hear the curator introduce Jami Porter Lara’s striking sculptures.
Virginia Treanor, associate curator, National Museum of Women in the Arts

Hear from the Artist

“Two-liter bottle”

Hear how the U.S.-Mexico border inspired Porter Lara’s two-liter bottle shapes.
Artwork referenced: JMS-MHB-2LBR-0913CE-03, 2013, pit-fired clay; On loan from Kenji Kondo

“Container for ideas”

Hear Porter Lara reflect on vessels meant to hold ideas, rather than substances.
Artwork referenced: LDS-MHB-KABR-0316CE-01, 2016, pit-fired clay; On loan from the collection of Scott Allocco and Douglas Clark

“Ritual objects”

Hear Porter Lara discuss the mystery of non-functional vessels.
Artwork referenced: LDS-MHB-DBBR-0316CE-01, 2016, pit-fired clay; On loan from Gwyn Metz

“Rattles”

Hear Porter Lara shake a sculpture with a rattle inside.
Artwork referenced: Go On Now, 2016, pit-fired clay; courtesy Central Features Contemporary Art

“Six necks”

Hear Porter Lara explore ideas about hybridity and mutancy.
Artwork referenced: MHB-6SBR-0916CE-01, 2016, pit-fired clay; Museum purchase: Members’ Acquisition Fund

Making it Manifest

Hear how Porter Lara employed visual thinking to create her artist statement.
Artwork referenced: Making it Manifest, 2014; Reproduction of original drawing

“Piece of fruit”

Hear how Porter Lara emphasizes organic forms in some of her work.
Artwork referenced: LDS-MHB-LPBR-0416CE-01, 2016, pit-fired clay; On loan from Emilie Porter-Rand and Marc Basiliere

“Wedding vase”

Hear about the Pueblo pottery that inspired the shape of this work.
Artwork referenced: LDS-MHB-WVBR-0416CE-08, 2016, pit-fired clay; On loan from Debra Baxter