Urgent Museum Notice

Image for 5 Fast Facts: Amy Sherald

5 Fast Facts: Amy Sherald

Blog Category:  Artist Spotlight

Impress your friends with five fast facts about painter Amy Sherald (b. 1973), whose work is on view in NMWA’s collection galleries.

NMWA visitors study Amy Sherald’s Amy Sherald’s It Made Sense…Mostly In Her Mind, 2011 (left) and They call me Redbone but I’d rather be Strawberry Shortcake, 2009 (right); Photo: Emily Haight, NMWA
NMWA visitors study Amy Sherald’s It Made Sense…Mostly In Her Mind, 2011 (left) and They call me Redbone but I’d rather be Strawberry Shortcake, 2009 (right); Photo: Emily Haight, NMWA

1. Figure It Out
Sherald’s fascination with portraiture began at a young age when she explored art history through encyclopedias. Enthralled by the illustrations, she came to the conclusion that a great artist has the ability to expertly render the human form.
2. Make It Big
Sherald first visited a museum on a sixth grade field trip, and she still remembers the impact of seeing Bo Bartlett’s 10-by-14-foot Object Permanence (1986). This work sparked her desire to create large-scale figurative paintings.
3. Do What You Love
The daughter of a dentist, Sherald entered Clark-Atlanta University as a pre-med student, but her passion for painting was too strong to ignore. She switched majors in the middle of her junior year and began to focus on her art in earnest.

Amy Sherald, They call me Redbone but I’d rather be Strawberry Shortcake, 2009; Oil on canvas, 54 x 43 in.; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Gift of Steven Scott, Baltimore, in honor of the artist and the 25th Anniversary of NMWA; © Amy Sherald
Amy Sherald, They call me Redbone but I’d rather be Strawberry Shortcake, 2009; Oil on canvas, 54 x 43 in.; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Gift of Steven Scott, Baltimore, in honor of the artist and the 25th Anniversary of NMWA; © Amy Sherald

4. Model Behavior
The model featured in They Call Me Redbone but I’d Rather Be Strawberry Shortcake (2009), in NMWA’s collection, also appears in another of work by Sherald, Well Prepared and Maladjusted (2008). According to the artist, “[The model] was tall and different looking, and she had this really awesome Afro bouff.”
5. Herstory
In 2016, Sherald became the first woman to win the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery’s Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition for her work Miss Everything (Unsuppressed Deliverance) (2013).
Want to meet the artist? Join us on May 9, 2017 for a special Artists in Conversation program featuring Amy Sherald. Reserve your spot online!

Related Posts

  • Edna Reindel: An Inspiring Artist for an Unprecedented Time

    Posted: May 27, 2020 in Artist Spotlight
    Edna Reindel's "Women at War" paintings express her viewpoint that humans endure—and even thrive— during challenging times when they work communally and pursue equity.
    Painting of a light-skinned woman wearing safety goggles and working with machinery in an industrial warehouse setting. In the background, other light-skinned figures work on airplane parts.
    Blog Category:  Artist Spotlight
  • Xaviera Simmons: “How might our entire history have been different…?”

    Posted: Jan 08, 2020 in Artist Spotlight
    In her writings on racial and social justice, Xaviera Simmons has expressed a desire to understand what it takes to shift political systems. Her art works to shift our notions of race, history, and collective narratives.
    Blog Category:  Artist Spotlight
  • Landscape of Change: Janaina Tschäpe’s “100 Little Deaths”

    Posted: Oct 15, 2019 in Artist Spotlight
    Janaina Tschäpe began her "100 Little Deaths" series in 1996 as an exploration of landscape, transmutation, and death. Each self-portrait depicts the artist sprawled face down in different environments around the world, often with limbs akimbo.
    Blog Category:  Artist Spotlight