Urgent Museum Notice

Image for 5 Fast Facts: Anne Truitt

5 Fast Facts: Anne Truitt

Blog Category:  5 Fast Facts

Impress your friends with five fast facts about artist Anne Truitt (1921–2004), whose work is on view in NMWA’s collection galleries.

Anne Truitt, Summer Dryad, 1971; Acrylic on wood; 76 x 13 x 8 inches; National Museum of Women in the Arts, Gift of the Holladay Foundation; © Anne Truitt
Anne Truitt, Summer Dryad, 1971; Acrylic on wood; 76 x 13 x 8 inches; NMWA, Gift of the Holladay Foundation; © Anne Truitt

Anne Truitt (1921–2004)
1. Unlikely Union
Truitt straddled the line between post-World War II wild child Abstract Expressionism, known for the emotional use and gestural application of color, and its austere successor Minimalism, notable for geometric, manufactured forms. She simultaneously evokes Joan Mitchell’s expressive use of color and John McCracken’s perfect planks.
2. Minimal Representation
Truitt was one of only three women included in the groundbreaking Minimalism exhibition Primary Structures: Younger American and British Sculptors at the Jewish Museum in 1966. Judy Chicago (then known as Judy Gerowitz) and Tina Spiro (Matkovic) also presented works in the exhibition, making the gender representation ratio one woman for every 13 men.
3. Tricky Truitt
Truitt unabashedly employed trompe l’oeil techniques to trick viewers’ eyes. Recessed bases give the impression that her works hover ever so slightly off the floor. Truitt’s subtle shifts in color create the illusion of three-dimensionality on the flat sides of her sculptures.
4. Collaborative Creation
Beginning in 1961, Truitt stopped constructing her own sculptures, focusing her time and energy instead on painting their surfaces. This begs viewers to consider the concept of authorship in relation to artworks made in collaboration.
5. Directions
In preparatory drawings for Summer Dryad (1971) Truitt assigned a cardinal direction to each side of the sculpture, suggesting the current display of the work at NMWA is how she wished for it to be installed and seen.

Related Posts

  • 5 Fast Facts: Kirsten Justesen

    Posted: Jul 22, 2020 in 5 Fast Facts
    Impress your friends with five fast facts about Kirsten Justesen, whose work is on view in NMWA’s collection galleries.
    A black-and-white self-portrait of a light-skinned older woman with shoulder-length blonde hair who lays on the middle shelf of a large wooden cabinent. She is in a relaxed fetal position; one hand props her head up and the other is draped over the shelf. Above her a collection of tiny statues are arranged by size, on the shelf below her are a tea pot and two boxes.
    Blog Category:  5 Fast Facts
  • 5 Fast Facts: Elizabeth Jane Gardner Bouguereau

    Posted: Jul 08, 2020 in 5 Fast Facts
    Impress your friends with five fast facts about Elizabeth Gardner Bouguereau, whose work is on view in NMWA’s collection galleries.
    Realistic painting depicts a light-skinned young man with dark curly hair, wearing a white tunic, set before distant mountains. He is kneeling victoriously atop a fearsome dead lion, clutching a serene lamb his right arm and gesturing heavenward with his left arm.
    Blog Category:  5 Fast Facts
  • 5 Fast Facts: Zanele Muholi

    Posted: Jun 29, 2020 in 5 Fast Facts
    Impress your friends with five fast facts about artist Zanele Muholi, whose work is on view in NMWA’s collection galleries.
    Two dark-skinned young women with short hair sit together against a white brick wall, their limbs lovingly intertwined and glowing smiles across their faces. One wears a white bra and shorts, and the other a white tank-top and blue shorts.
    Blog Category:  5 Fast Facts