Urgent Museum Notice

Image for The Common Thread: Quilt Grids

The Common Thread: Quilt Grids

Blog Category:  Artist Spotlight

In Quilts as Women’s Art: A Quilt Poetics, quilter and activist Radka Donnell discusses an organizational feature of the quilt—its “grid”—which she defines as the element that is “not locking but only tentatively ordering the whole by calibrating the unlike into a fascinating puzzle action.” She explains that the grid can function either as a “diagnostic aid” or as a starting point for the visual effects of the surface design.

Pictorial Quilt, ca. 1840; Cotton and cotton thread, 67 ¾ x 85 ½ in.; Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Mrs. Franklin Chace, 44.173.1; Photography by Gavin Ashworth, 2012, courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum
Pictorial Quilt, ca. 1840; Cotton and cotton thread, 67 ¾ x 85 ½ in.; Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Mrs. Franklin Chace, 44.173.1; Photography by Gavin Ashworth, 2012, courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum

“Workt by Hand” features a variety of quilts demonstrating the range of craftsmanship, creativity, and vision of the women who created them. Still, many of these quilts are tied together by the concept of the grid. Some quilts have, as Donnell states, more physical depictions of gridlines and separations. For example, at first glance the Pictorial Quilt, 1840, may seem like a mere conglomeration of symbols and pictures, but it does not take long to notice clearly-stitched delineations between the twenty different blocks. Therefore, the grid in this quilt acts as an integrating device that brings otherwise irregular objects into a regular scheme.
Even quilts with seemingly haphazard patterns, such as crazy quilts, still have an underlying visual order. Anna Williams’s Quilt, 1995, creates the essence of a grid instead of emphasizing the stitching together of separate blocks. Williams improvises as well as uses traditional block settings, giving the grid a slightly different function—it is not simply an integrating device, but an arrangement of geometric play.
Anna Williams, Quilt, 1995; Cotton and synthetics, 76 ¼ x 61 ½ in.; Brooklyn Museum, Gift in memory of Horace H. Solomon, 2011.18; Photography by Gavin Ashworth, 2012, courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum
Anna Williams, Quilt, 1995; Cotton and synthetics, 76 ¼ x 61 ½ in.; Brooklyn Museum, Gift in memory of Horace H. Solomon, 2011.18; Photography by Gavin Ashworth, 2012, courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum

Since it is not as standardized and obvious as the grid laid out in the Pictorial Quilt, this arrangement amplifies the viewer’s desire to find structure in chaos. Donnell compares this experience to interpreting poetry, where one must reach a compromise between the established regularities of language and the irregularities of individual existence and emotion.
Despite their variety and their disparate origins, the other quilts on view in “Workt by Hand” similarly use the concept of the grid in nuanced and interesting ways. Though the quilt grid is flexible enough to be personalized, the examples all show their makers’ use of its underlying structure as a common thread.
—Kyla Crisostomo is the publications and marketing/communications intern at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Related Posts

  • Welcome!

    Posted: Jul 06, 2009 in Director's Desk
    As the director of the National Museum of Women in the Arts, I welcome you to our new blog, Broad Strokes: NMWA’s Blog for the 21st Century! As NMWA enters...
    The artist stands in a stage-like space framed by white curtains. Beneath black hair woven with red yarn and flowers, heavy brows accent her dark-eyed gaze. Clad in a fringed, honey-toned shawl; long, pink skirt; and gold jewelry, she holds a bouquet and a handwritten letter.
    Blog Category:  Director's Desk
  • What's in a frame?

    Posted: Jul 20, 2009 in Behind the Scenes
    Why do people visit art museums? That’s easy: to see art. But all too often when strolling through our favorite galleries, we forget to take notice of those unsung objects...
    Close up shot of a gallery wall installed salon style, with many small paintings hung closely together.
    Blog Category:  Behind the Scenes
  • Artist Spotlight: Interview with Maggie Foskett

    Posted: Sep 18, 2009 in Artist Spotlight
    Maggie Foskett (American, b.1919) would not have you call her a “nature artist;” nor is she a romantic about humanity’s relationship with the natural world. Rather, she is an artist...
    Blog Category:  Artist Spotlight